Monday, February 8, 2010

In the War Room, Recuiting 2011 . . .

Over the weekend, the absolute pathology of the Auburn-Alabama rivalry was played out in the little north Alabama town of Cullman. There, Spencer Region, a lifelong Alabama fan who had already committed to the Tide and whose parents showed up at their son's obligatory press conference draped in crimson, announced he will attend Auburn instead.


A little background. On Signing Day, after having lost two prized commitments, Tide coach Nick Saban called himself old-fashioned, and said a commitment should mean the end of the recruiting for a particular player. If you want to visit schools, he said, don't commit until you finish.

Region, a big offensive lineman, wanted to commit to Alabama. But he also wanted his trips. Apparently over the weekend, Saban told him to visit the other schools, but he wouldn't be guaranteed a spot at Alabama's recruiting class, which is expected to be the smallest of the Saban era. Auburn coach Gene Chizik saw an opening. He reportedly had two phone conversations with Region, and told him Alabama and Saban didn't respect the lineman because they would allow a truly prized recruit to visit as many campuses as he wanted.

The kid at some point agreed. He shocked just about everyone in attendance, and maybe even himself, by putting on the orange and blue hat. His mother was in tears afterward. Watch here.

Saban, courtesy of some footage ferreted out of Tuscaloosa by an Auburn double agent, didn't take the news well.

Just to think, NSD 2011 is a long way off.

MG




3 comments:

J said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
J said...

Well, that video captures The Evil Empire very well, in my opinion. Loved the reference to our towel-waving receivers coach.

I suspect Gene's going to have to stay in constant contact with this kid. If 'Bama were to win the title again I could see him getting all sentimental, especially if Mommy starts bawling again.

Michael said...

Knew you had a heart somewhere, J, though it appears that long-term exposure to barns has caused some mutations.